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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

August 01, 2007

The Asian Financial Crisis of 1997 a Decade On: Two Perspectives
All Fall Down: The Asian Financial Crisis, Neoliberalism and Economic Miracles
Shaken to the Core: Japan's Nuclear Program Battered by Niigata Quake
Japan as a Nuclear State
The Story of a Head That Fell Off
Okinawa and the Paradox of Public Opinion: Base Politics and Protest in Nago City, 1997-2007
A Contract Law that Enslaves Japanese Working People
Why Hiroshima and Nagasaki Day Events Matter. Hiroshima & Nagasaki Peace Declarations
Micronesia and the Postwar Remaking of the Asia Pacific: "An American Lake"
Shanghai Cooperation Organization Primed and Ready to Fire: Toward a Regional and Global Realignment?
Why Worry? Japan's Nuclear Plants at Grave Risk From Quake Damage
Carbon-Free and Nuclear-Free: A Roadmap for U.S. Energy Policy
The End of Alliance "Business as Usual"? Ozawa's Rejection of Japan's Indian Ocean Deployment
The Road to Peace in Northeast Asia - Prospects and Pitfalls
Nicolas Sarkozy's Conservative Revolution: The Price for France
Washington's double vision: al-Qaida, Iran and Global Islamo-fascism
The Atomic Bombs and the Soviet Invasion: What Drove Japan's Decision to Surrender?
People's Diplomacy: The Japan-China Friendship Association and Critical War Memory in the 1950s
The New 'NATO of the East' Takes Shape: The SCO and China, Russia and US Maneuvers
Climate Change and the Threat to Pacific Island Nations
Lee Hak Rae, the Korean Connection and "Japanese" War Crimes on the Burma-Thai Railway
Essential Ingredients of Truth: Japanese Soldiers' Diaries in the Asia Pacific War
Suicide is a social not an individual problem: Japan in International Perspective
Fishing. Western, Japanese and Islander Perceptions of Ecology and Modernization in the Pacific
China's Korean Autonomous Prefecture and China-Korea Border Politics
Passage of H.Res. 121 on "Comfort Women", the US Congress and Historical Memory in Japan
Sinking. Tuvalu and the Pacific Islands in an Age of Global Warming

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.