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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

Articles by Peter Dale Scott

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Peter Dale Scott is a former Canadian diplomat and English Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His latest book is The American Deep State: Wall Street, Big Oil, and the Attack on U.S. Democracy, published by Rowman & Littlefield. He is also the author of Drugs Oil and War, The Road to 9/11, The War Conspiracy: JFK, 9/11, and the Deep Politics of War, and American War Machine: Deep Politics, the CIA Global Drug Connection and the Road to Afghanistan. A contributing editor of the Asia-Pacific Journal, his website, which contains a wealth of his writings, is here.

 

The Threat to Indonesian Democracy in the New Gilded Age of Trump
Trump’s Indonesian Allies in Bed With ISIS-Backed FPI Militia Seek to Oust Elected President Jokowi
Still Uninvestigated After 50 Years: Did the U.S. Help Incite the 1965 Indonesia Massacre?
Islam, a Forgotten Holocaust, and American Historical Amnesia
North American Universities and the 1965 Indonesian Massacre: Indonesian Guilt and Western Responsibility 1965
The Fates of American Presidents Who Challenged the Deep State (1963-1980) (1963-1980)
The Dulles Brothers, Harry Dexter White, Alger Hiss, and the Fate of the Private Pre-War International Banking System
The American Deep State, Deep Events, and Off-the-Books Financing
The State, the Deep State, and the Wall Street Overworld (Updated March 13, 2014)
The Falsified War on Terror: How the US Has Protected Some of Its Enemies
US Government Protection of Al-Qaeda Terrorists and the US-Saudi Black Hole
Washington’s Battle Over Syrian Foreign Policy: Will Hawks Or Doves Prevail?
America’s Unchecked Security State: Part I: The Toxic Legacy of J. Edgar Hoover’s Illegal Powers
America’s Unchecked Security State: Part II: The Continuity of COG Detention Planning, 1948-2001
Systemic Destabilization in Recent American History: 9/11, the JFK Assassination, and the Oklahoma City Bombing as a Strategy of Tension
Why Americans Must End America’s Self-Generating Wars
The NATO Afghanistan War and US-Russian Relations: Drugs, Oil, and WarNATO−−
Launching the U.S. Terror War: the CIA, 9/11, Afghanistan, and Central Asia9.11
The Doomsday Project and Deep Events: JFK, Watergate, Iran-Contra, and 9/11():9.11 *Japanese translation available
Norway’s Terror as Systemic Destabilization: Breivik, the Arms-for-Drugs Milieu, and Global Shadow Elites−−
Bosnia, Kosovo, and Now Libya: The Human Costs of Washington’s On-Going Collusion with Terrorists−−
Coming to Jakarta and Deep Politics: How Writing a Poem Enabled Me to Write American War Machine (An Essay on Liberation)−−()
Rape in Libya: America’s recent major wars have all been accompanied by memorable falsehoods−−
The Libyan War, American Power and the Decline of the Petrodollar System Updated May 15, 2011
Who are the Libyan Freedom Fighters and Their Patrons? Peter Dale Scott’s Libyan Notebook (Updated March 27)−−(327)
North, Iran-Contra, and the Doomsday Project: The Original Congressional Cover Up of Continuity-of-Government Planning−−
The Doomsday Project, Deep Events, and the Shrinking of American Democracy
Is the State of Emergency Superseding the US Constitution? Continuity of Government Planning, War and American Society
Operation Paper: The United States and Drugs in Thailand and Burma
Kyrgyzstan, the U.S.and the Global Drug Problem: Deep Forcesand the Syndrome of Coups, Drugs, and Terror——
'Continuity of Government' Planning: War, Terror and the Supplanting of the U.S. Constitution—
Can the US Triumph in the Drug-Addicted War in Afghanistan? Opium, the CIA and the Karzai Administration—CIA
America's Afghanistan: The National Security and a Heroin-Ravaged State
Martial Law, the Financial Bailout, and the Afghan and Iraq Wars
Billions: The Politics of Influence in the United States, China and Israel
Korea (1950), the Tonkin Gulf Incident, and 9/11: Deep Events in Recent American History

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.