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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

Articles by Jon Mitchell

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Jon Mitchell is a British Journalist and correspondent for Okinawa Times. He was awarded the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Japan Freedom of the Press Award for Lifetime Achievement for his reporting about human rights issues - including military contamination - on Okinawa. He is the author of Tsuiseki: Okinawa no Karehazai (Chasing Agent Orange on Okinawa) (Koubunken 2014) and is a visiting researcher at the International Peace Research Institute of Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo. Mitchell is an Asia-Pacific Journal contributing editor.

CIA: How to shape Okinawan public opinion on the U.S. military presence
U.S. Marine Corps’ Lax Weapon Safety on Okinawa
U.S. Marine Corps Sexual Violence on Okinawa
Agent Orange on Okinawa: Six Years On
Environmental Contamination at USMC bases on Okinawa
Okinawa: U.S. Marines Corps training lectures denigrate local residents, hide military crimes.
Contamination at Largest US Air Force Base in Asia: Kadena, Okinawa
FOIA Documents: Drunk US Marine’s 2015 dump of toxic foam among accidents polluting Okinawa water supply
What Lessons Can Vietnam teach Okinawa about U.S. Military Dioxin?
FOIA Documents Reveal Agent Orange Dioxin, Toxic Dumps, Fish Kills on Okinawa Base. Two Veterans Win Compensation, Many More Denied
Vietnam: Okinawa's Forgotten War
What’s Hot
On Okinawa, U.S. Marines raise tensions with accusations and arrests of peace campaigners
The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan
Military Contamination on Okinawa: PCBs and Agent Orange at Kadena Air Base
Okinawa - The Pentagon’s Toxic Junk Heap of the Pacific
Okinawa Dumpsite Offers Proof of Agent Orange: Experts Say
Oliver Stone on Okinawa - The Untold Story
Nuchi Du Takara, Okinawan Resistance and the Battle for Henoko Bay
281_Anti Nuke: The Japanese street artist taking on Tokyo, TEPCO and the nation’s right-wing extremists 281_Anti Nuke
“Deny, deny until all the veterans die” - Pentagon investigation into Agent Orange on Okinawa
Operation Red Hat: Chemical weapons and the Pentagon smokescreen on Okinawa
“Herbicide Stockpile” at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa: 1971 U.S. Army report on Agent Orange
Were U.S marines used as guinea pigs on Okinawa?
Agent Orange on Okinawa - The Smoking Gun: U.S. army report, photographs show 25,000 barrels on island in early ‘70s
“Seconds Away From Midnight”: U.S. Nuclear Missile Pioneers on Okinawa Break Fifty Year Silence on a Hidden Nuclear Crisis of 1962 -- −−196250
Agent Orange at Okinawa's Futenma Base in 1980s1980
U.S. Veteran Exposes Pentagon’s Denials of Agent Orange Use on Okinawa
U.S. Vets Win Payouts Over Agent Orange Use on Okinawa
Agent Orange on Okinawa: Buried Evidence?−−?• Japanese translation is available
Agent Orange on Okinawa - New Evidence−− •Japanese translation available
US Military Defoliants on Okinawa: Agent Orange−− •Japanese translation is available
Barrier free, border free
Beggars' Belief: The Farmers' Resistance Movement on Iejima Island, Okinawa——
What’s Hot
Okinawan Leaders Carry Osprey Protest to Tokyo
What’s Hot
Campaign to prevent the next Battle of Okinawa
What’s Hot
U.S. Military Parents on Okinawa Demand Truth About Toxic Contamination Near Base Schools
What’s Hot
All Agent Orange Ingredients Unearthed at U.S. Military Dumpsite on Okinawa

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.