Menu

 

Asia-Pacific Journal Subscription Drive July 2019

With tensions between the US and China at fever pitch in the era of Donald Trump, with mounting conflict between the US and Korea, between China and the nations of the South China Sea, and between Okinawa and the US-Japan, APJ is a vital resource. The media has treated the primary conflicts as economic and financial, but they are deeply intertwined with geopolitical conflicts that could easily lead to war including nuclear war.

APJ has no corporate, foundation or university angel, so our ability to publish relies heavily on our core supporters.

We come to you twice a year to request the financial support that allows us to provide APJ free to our 22,000 regular readers and thousands of others around the world who receive the journal as subscribers or via Facebook or Twitter. The journal is strong and growing. We need support to publish and to maintain it free to global readers.

If you value the journal, please go to our homepage http://apjjf.org/Subscribe where you can both subscribe to our semi-monthly Newsletter and contribute (tax free) via Paypal or credit card.

All contributions are welcome. But we need support in the range of $100-500-1,000 to maintain the site toward our annual goal of $12,000. We're $2,800 toward our goal. Thank you for your support. This drive will end in early August ... but it's not too late to contribute.

The Editors

Articles by Yamamoto Yuzo

« Back to list

Yamamoto Yuzo (1887 - 1974) was a playwright and novelist from Tochigi Prefecture who graduated from Tokyo University. He made his debut as a dramatist with Seimei no kanmuri (1920; tr. The Crown of Life, 1935). An admirer of such playwrights as Henrik Ibsen and Gerhart Hauptmann, Yamamoto also translated August Strindberg’s plays, wrote popular and critically acclaimed novels and children’s literature, and helped found the Japanese Writers’ Association with Kikuchi Kan and Akutagawa Ryunosuke. During World War II he spoke out against the government’s censorship policies, and after the war served in the Diet on Japanese language reform, advocating limited use of complex ideograms (kanji). He was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit in 1965. After his death, his European-style home in Mitaka, Tokyo, was converted into a museum. His drama Infanticide (Eijigoroshi) was published in 1920.