Menu
Donate Button

 

Asia-Pacific Journal Subscription Drive December 2020

Ours is a reader-supported journal. We invite your support at a time when the Asia-Pacific and our world are being turned upside down by the combination of US-China conflict in the era of the Coronavirus pandemic and economic, political, climate and nuclear crisis. Thank you for your support. We have received $10,100 toward our $12,000 goal. This ends our subscription drive, but if you still wish to contribute and you value the Journal, please go to the Subscription page and contribute. For US tax payers, donations are tax-deductible.

 

The National Politics of the Yasukuni Shrine

November 2, 2006
Volume 4 | Issue 11
Article ID 2272
The National Politics of the Yasukuni Shrine

By Takahashi Tetsuya


Takahashi Tetsuya's "The National Politics of the Yasukuni Shrine," is among the most important statements to emerge from the debate over Yasukuni Shrine, historical memory and war nationalism.The article is here

Japan Focus is pleased to present chapter seven of Naoko Shimazu, ed., Nationalisms in Japan. Philip Seaton is the translator.



Takahashi Tetsuya is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tokyo. A philosopher and the author of the best-selling Yasukuni Mondai (The Yasukuni Problem). His current research interests center on problems of deconstruction, history and memory, and the Showa era.



Philip Seaton is Associate Professor, Institute of Language and Culture Studies, Hokkaido University. He is currently researching war-related commemorative programmes on Japanese television and undertaking an oral history project focusing on how members of the postwar generations have reacted to knowledge of relatives' war experiences.

We thank Takahashi, Shimazu, Seaton and Routledge for their cooperation in publishing this article.

Find a podcast of Takahashi Tetsuya's lecture of March 6, 2007 on
Postwar Japan on the Brink: Militarism, Colonialism, Yasukuni Shrine.
This was the inaugural lecture of The Tetsuo Najita Distinguished Lecture Series in Japanese Studies at the University of Chicago.