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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

X Culture, Education & the Arts
Are You Listening to the Voices of the Victims? My Critique of Park Yuha’s Comfort Women of the Empire
FEATURE
Selections from Nurtured by Love
FEATURE
Calligraphy: Three Heian Poems
Transnational and Japanese Activism on Behalf of Indonesian and Dutch Victims of Enforced Military Prostitution During World War II
PERSPECTIVE
Perry’s Black Ships in Japan and Ryukyu: The Whitewash of History
FEATURE
A Childhood Memoir of Wartime Japan
FEATURE
Masks of Whatchamacallit: A Nagasaki Tale
FEATURE
Selected Haiku
FEATURE
The Song the Owl God Himself Sang, “Silver Droplets Fall Fall All Around,” An Ainu Tale
FEATURE
Swaying, Swinging
Muddy River
Okinawans Say “No Pasarán” to the U.S. Marines: A delegation to Washington asks the Obama administration to respect democracy
'Do we have peace now?' poem by Okinawa teen Chinen Masaru
Civilization & Barbarism: Cartoon Commentary & “The White Man’s Burden” (1898–1902)
Hanaoka Monogatari: The Massacre of Chinese Forced Laborers, Summer 1945 1945
To Hell With Capitalism: Snapshots from the Crab Cannery Ship
The Abe Government and the 2014 Screening of Japanese Junior High School History Textbooks 2014
Vietnam: Okinawa's Forgotten War
Illusions of Self: The Life and Poetry of Ishikawa Takuboku
Horses, Horses, In the Innocence of Light
Saotome Katsumoto and the Firebombing of Tokyo: Introducing The Great Tokyo Air Raid
Tokyo 1960: Days of Rage & Grief: Hamaya Hiroshi’s Photos of the Anti-Security-Treaty Protests
The Emperor Qianlong’s Tours of Southern China: Painting, Poetry, and the Politics of Spectacle
FEATURE
Introduction: Art and Activism in Post-Disaster Japan
FEATURE
Remembering Hiroshima and the Lucky Dragon in Chim↑Pom’s Level 7 feat. “Myth of Tomorrow”
FEATURE
Natural Disaster, Trauma and Activism in the Art of Takamine Tadasu
FEATURE
Images of Suffering, Resilience and Compassion in Post 3/11 Japan
Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923
'Life's First Night' and the Treatment of Hansen's Disease in Japan
'Only a disciplined people can build a nation': North Korean Mass Games and Third Worldism in Guyana, 1980-1992
The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan
Going Native, Going Global: The Violin in Modern Japan
Confucius Institutes: Academic Malware
Gender Equality in Japan: The Equal Employment Opportunity Law Revisited
The Modern Girl as Militarist: Female Soldiers In and Beyond Japan’ Self-Defense Forces
The Two-Sen Copper Coin
'If we don't face our past, we're bound to repeat the same mistakes.' Japanese wartime medical orderly reports on army's role in maintaining 'comfort women' system
The Japanese Way of Silence and Seclusion: Memes of Imperial Women
Literature and The Trauma of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
New Lives: Some Case Studies of Minamata
Three Cheers for Abe's High-Tech CLT Wooden Arrow: The Future of Japanese Construction
Uprising: Music, youth, and protest against the policies of the Abe Shinzō government
Exhibiting the Past: China’s Nanjing Massacre Memorial Museum
Japan in the public culture of South Korea, 1945–2000s: The making and remaking of colonial sites and memories
Visualizing Protest in Modern Japan
Imperial Tokyo as a Contact Zone: the Metropolitan Tours of Taiwanese Aborigines, 1897-1941
Migrant Workers’ Children and China’s Future: The Educational Divide
Safecast or the Production of Collective Intelligence on Radiation Risks after 3.11
Are You Coming to the Matsuri?: Tsunami Recovery and Folk Performance Culture on Iwate's Rikuch Coast
The 1911 Revolution and the Frontier: The 'Political Game' and 'State-Building' in Outer Mongolia during the 1911 Revolution

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.