Menu

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

X Society & Social Change
From Fukushima: To Despair Properly, To Find the Next Step
The Stories Japanese Clothes Tell: Introduction
“We need to recognize this hopeless sight…. To recognize that this horrible crime is what our country is doing to us”: Interview with Mutō Ruiko
Hitler's dismantling of the constitution and the current path of Japan's Abe administration: What lessons can we draw from history?
PERSPECTIVE
Japanese Elections: The Ghost of Constitutional Revision and Campaign Discourse
Muddy River
Okinawans Say “No Pasarán” to the U.S. Marines: A delegation to Washington asks the Obama administration to respect democracy
All Okinawa Goes to Washington – The Okinawan Appeal to the American Government and People
FEATURE
To Whom Does the Sea Belong? Questions Posed by the Henoko Assessment
Should “Gunkanjima” Be a World Heritage site? - The forgotten scars of Korean forced labor
Opening the Door to Peace on the Korean Peninsula: Women Cross DMZ
'Do we have peace now?' poem by Okinawa teen Chinen Masaru
Civilization & Barbarism: Cartoon Commentary & “The White Man’s Burden” (1898–1902)
Surviving the Last Train From Hiroshima: The Poignant Case of a Double Hibakusha
Hanaoka Monogatari: The Massacre of Chinese Forced Laborers, Summer 1945 1945
Fukushima and the Crisis of Democracy: Interview with Murakami Tatsuya
To Hell With Capitalism: Snapshots from the Crab Cannery Ship
The Sense of Sacred: Mauna Kea and Oura Bay
The Abe Government and the 2014 Screening of Japanese Junior High School History Textbooks 2014
Repatriation But Not “Return”: A Japanese Brazilian Dekasegi Goes Back to Brazil
Illusions of Self: The Life and Poetry of Ishikawa Takuboku
Womenomics for Japan: is the Abe policy for gendered employment viable in an era of precarity?
Producing Okinawan Cultural Identity in Hawai`i’s 'Multicultural Paradise'
FEATURE
The Recognition of Nuclear Trauma in Sagashite imasu (I am Searching)
A Suitable Donor: Harvesting Kidneys in the Philippines
The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan
Japan's Radical Energy Technocrats: Structural Reform Through Smart Communities, the Feed-in Tariff and Japanese-Style 'Stadtwerke' (FiT)Stadtwerke ()
Gender Equality in Japan: The Equal Employment Opportunity Law Revisited
The Modern Girl as Militarist: Female Soldiers In and Beyond Japan’ Self-Defense Forces
The Fates of American Presidents Who Challenged the Deep State (1963-1980) (1963-1980)
The Japan-Korea Solidarity Movement in the 1970s and 1980s: From Solidarity to Reflexive Democracy
Three Cheers for Abe's High-Tech CLT Wooden Arrow: The Future of Japanese Construction
Uprising: Music, youth, and protest against the policies of the Abe Shinzō government
Bounded Collectivism: Approaching Rural Land Rights and Labor Through “Natural Villages” in Southwest China
The Radiation That Makes People Invisible: A Global Hibakusha Perspective
After the Deluge: Tsunami and the Great Wall of Japan
Limited Regular Employment and the Reform of Japan’s Division of Labor
Visualizing Protest in Modern Japan
Migrant Workers’ Children and China’s Future: The Educational Divide
Safecast or the Production of Collective Intelligence on Radiation Risks after 3.11
Infanticide
The Extraordinary Story of the Komagata Maru: Commemorating the One Hundred Year Challenge to Canada’s Immigration Colour Bar
Scientists and Research on the Effects of Radiation Exposure: From Hiroshima to Fukushima —
The Anime Director, the Fantasy Girl and the Very Real Tsunami
Henoko and the U.S. Military: A History of Dependence and Resistance−−
Fukushima and Okinawa – the “Abandoned People,” and Civic Empowerment−−
Young Japanese Temporary Workers Create Their Own Unions
Class and Work in Cultural Capitalism: Japanese Trends−−
The US-Japan Alliance Must Evolve: The Futenma Flip-Flop, the Hatoyama Failure, and the Future
Get FIT: Public Policy, the Smart State and the Energy-Environmental Revolution−−

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.