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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

X Economics & Resources
China’s Continuing Renewable Energy Revolution – latest trends in electric power generation
From Fukushima: To Despair Properly, To Find the Next Step
Facing Extinction: Can the Pacific Bluefin Tuna be Saved?
Hioki’s Smart Community and Japan’s Structural Reform
PERSPECTIVE
Japanese Elections: The Ghost of Constitutional Revision and Campaign Discourse
Okinawans Say “No Pasarán” to the U.S. Marines: A delegation to Washington asks the Obama administration to respect democracy
FEATURE
To Whom Does the Sea Belong? Questions Posed by the Henoko Assessment
Civilization & Barbarism: Cartoon Commentary & “The White Man’s Burden” (1898–1902)
The Trans-Pacific Partnership: A Deeply Flawed Partnership (TPP)
To Hell With Capitalism: Snapshots from the Crab Cannery Ship
The Sense of Sacred: Mauna Kea and Oura Bay
Africa and China's 21st Century Maritime Silk Road
The Greening of China's Black Electric Power System? Insights from 2014 Data
Japan’s 1905 Incorporation of Dokdo/Takeshima: A Historical Perspective
Komatsu, Smart Construction, Creative Destruction, and Japan’s Robot Revolution 、
Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience as Structural Reform in Abenomics
North American Universities and the 1965 Indonesian Massacre: Indonesian Guilt and Western Responsibility 1965
A Suitable Donor: Harvesting Kidneys in the Philippines
The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan
Transforming Mongolia-Russia-China Relations: The Dushanbe Trilateral Summit
China's renewable energy revolution: what is driving it?
The Fates of American Presidents Who Challenged the Deep State (1963-1980) (1963-1980)
Hiroshima's Disaster, Climate Crisis, and the Future of the Resilient City
Dirty Wars: French and American Piaster Profiteering in Indochina, 1945-75
Three Cheers for Abe's High-Tech CLT Wooden Arrow: The Future of Japanese Construction
Bounded Collectivism: Approaching Rural Land Rights and Labor Through “Natural Villages” in Southwest China
Doom and Gloom or Economic Boom? The Myth of the 'North Korean Collapse'
The Bumble Bee and the Chrysanthemum: Comparing Sweden and Japan’s Responses to Financial Crisis
The Dulles Brothers, Harry Dexter White, Alger Hiss, and the Fate of the Private Pre-War International Banking System
Limited Regular Employment and the Reform of Japan’s Division of Labor
China’s Continuing Renewable Energy Revolution: Global Implications
Worker-Intellectual Unity: Suicide, trans-border sociological intervention, and the Foxconn-Apple connection
The Asia-Pacific in the Eye of Super-storms
Cover-Up: Toyota and Quality Control
Taiwan and the Ryukyus (Okinawa) in Asia-Pacific Multilateral Relations – a Long-term Historical Perspective on Territorial Claims and Conflicts
Rape in Libya: America’s recent major wars have all been accompanied by memorable falsehoods−−
Young Japanese Temporary Workers Create Their Own Unions
Ethnic Identity, Culture, and Race: Japanese and Nikkei at Home and Abroad−−
Kyrgyzstan, the U.S.and the Global Drug Problem: Deep Forcesand the Syndrome of Coups, Drugs, and Terror——
Gravity Defying: Whither Korea’s bid to build a world-class city entirely from scratch?
The Exquisite Corpses of Nature and History: The Case of the Korean DMZ
Tokyo's Mean Streets
The Rising Importance of Chinese Labour in the Greater Mekong Sub-Region
After the Whirlwind: Post-Nargis Burma, the 2010 Elections and Prospects for Reform
East Asian Regionalism and its Enemies in Three Epochs: Political Economy and Geopolitics, 16th to 21st Centuries
Imaging Communities: Gendered Mobile Media in the Asia-Pacific
Japan's Twenty Year Response to Economic Crisis
Overproduction not Financial Collapse is the Heart of the Crisis: the US, East Asia, and the World
The US and the Temptation of Dollar Seignorage
China, Japan, and Indonesia's LNG Ploys

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.