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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

X Politics & Ideology
Japan’s Problematic Prefecture – Okinawa and the US-Japan Relationship
Are You Listening to the Voices of the Victims? My Critique of Park Yuha’s Comfort Women of the Empire
From Fukushima: To Despair Properly, To Find the Next Step
Hitler's dismantling of the constitution and the current path of Japan's Abe administration: What lessons can we draw from history?
PERSPECTIVE
Perry’s Black Ships in Japan and Ryukyu: The Whitewash of History
FEATURE
Masks of Whatchamacallit: A Nagasaki Tale
PERSPECTIVE
Japanese Elections: The Ghost of Constitutional Revision and Campaign Discourse
Okinawans Say “No Pasarán” to the U.S. Marines: A delegation to Washington asks the Obama administration to respect democracy
All Okinawa Goes to Washington – The Okinawan Appeal to the American Government and People
To the Courts! To the Streets! Okinawa at December 2015
FEATURE
Introduction: The Experts Report and the Future of Okinawa
FEATURE
Okinawan Experts Commission Reports Flaws in Authorization Process for New Military Base at Henoko
FEATURE
To Whom Does the Sea Belong? Questions Posed by the Henoko Assessment
Should “Gunkanjima” Be a World Heritage site? - The forgotten scars of Korean forced labor
Opening the Door to Peace on the Korean Peninsula: Women Cross DMZ
Civilization & Barbarism: Cartoon Commentary & “The White Man’s Burden” (1898–1902)
Hanaoka Monogatari: The Massacre of Chinese Forced Laborers, Summer 1945 1945
Japan’s Proposed National Security Legislation — Will This Be the End of Article 9?
Fukushima and the Crisis of Democracy: Interview with Murakami Tatsuya
Zen and War: A Commentary on Brian Victoria and Karl Baier's Analysis of Daisetz Suzuki and Count Dürckheim
To Hell With Capitalism: Snapshots from the Crab Cannery Ship
The Sense of Sacred: Mauna Kea and Oura Bay
Vietnam: Okinawa's Forgotten War
Islam, a Forgotten Holocaust, and American Historical Amnesia
“All Japan” versus “All Okinawa” - Abe Shinzo’s Military-Firstism
FEATURE
Introduction: Art and Activism in Post-Disaster Japan
Australia’s “Asian Century”: Time, Space and Public Culture
Sink the Asahi! The ‘Comfort Women’ Controversy and the Neo-nationalist Attack !
Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience as Structural Reform in Abenomics
The Erosion of Democracy in South Korea: The Dissolution of the Unified Progressive Party and the Incarceration of Lee Seok-ki ()
North American Universities and the 1965 Indonesian Massacre: Indonesian Guilt and Western Responsibility 1965
The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan
Gender Equality in Japan: The Equal Employment Opportunity Law Revisited
Three Views of Local Consciousness in Hong Kong
The Fates of American Presidents Who Challenged the Deep State (1963-1980) (1963-1980)
'If we don't face our past, we're bound to repeat the same mistakes.' Japanese wartime medical orderly reports on army's role in maintaining 'comfort women' system
Democracy's Porous Borders: Espionage, Smuggling and the Making of Japan's Transwar Regime (Part 2)
The Life and Death of Lafcadio Hearn: A 110-year perspective
The Japan-Korea Solidarity Movement in the 1970s and 1980s: From Solidarity to Reflexive Democracy
The Myth of the 'Pacifist' Japanese Constitution
“Comrade Carlos Bulosan”: U.S. State Surveillance And the Cold War Suppression of Filipino Radicals
Okinawa’s “Darkest Year”
Dirty Wars: French and American Piaster Profiteering in Indochina, 1945-75
Three Cheers for Abe's High-Tech CLT Wooden Arrow: The Future of Japanese Construction
Uprising: Music, youth, and protest against the policies of the Abe Shinzō government
The Overseas Dispatch of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces and U.S. War Preparations
After the Deluge: Tsunami and the Great Wall of Japan
Xi Jinping Visits Seoul: The Bigger Picture
The Japan-China Confrontation Over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands – Between “shelving” and “dispute escalation”
Trial Support Groups Lobby for Japanese Prisoner Rights, Fight to Rectify Injustices

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.