Menu

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

Post-Fukushima Realities and Japan’s Energy Future  フクシマ後の現実と日本のエネルギーの将来

August 13, 2012
Volume 10 | Issue 33 | Number 2

Post-Fukushima Realities and Japan’s Energy Future

An interview with Aileen Mioko Smith

Fresh Currents: Japan’s flow from a nuclear past to a renewable future is an e-book edited by Eric Johnston in cooperation with The Kyoto Journal that considers the possibility of replacing the Faustian bargain of a nuclear-and-fossil-fuel powered Japan with a renewable energy future.

We present Fresh Current’s wide-ranging interview with Aileen Mioko Smith of Kyoto-based Green Action, whose lifetime of activism spans the movement from the early 1970s to achieve justice for the victims of Minamata Disease (mercury poisoning by corporate giant Chisso) to the contemporary movement to end nuclear power, care compassionately for the victims, and transform Japan’s energy profile.

Smith reflects on the extraordinary size and persistence of recent mass protests against nuclear power, the reasons for their vitality, and the role of social media in facilitating spontaneous protest. But she also offers a clear-headed look at what will be required for the movement to achieve its goals, beginning with public education about nuclear power and energy alternatives, and educating the politicians who will make the decisions. But she also notes the powerful financial and institutional obstacles to political change at the center. Her careful comparison of similarities between government obfuscation and resistance to recognizing and acting on the disasters at Minamata and Fukushima is a powerful warning of the difficulties that anti-nuclear forces face.

Nevertheless, as this issue goes to press, it is striking that the ruling Democratic Party, which scorned public opinion in the June restart of the Oi nuclear reactors but now face the likelihood of a fall election, is actively considering running on a platform calling for the closure of all nuclear power plants and investment in green energy, and that significant steps are underway throughout Japan to promote green alternatives.

The entire Fresh Currents e-book is available here.
The article is available here.


Recommended Citation: Aileen Mioko Smith, "Post-Fukushima Realities and Japan’s Energy Future," The Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol 10 Issue 33, No. 2, August 13, 2012.

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.