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The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

See below for information about the prize.

 

US Asks Japan to Stop Iran Oil Development: Sankei Shinbun

March 29, 2006
Volume 4 | Issue 3

US Asks Japan to Stop Iran Oil Development: Sankei Shinbun

By Elaine Lies

TOKYO (Reuters) - The United States has informally asked Japan to suspend its plans to develop an Iranian oil field as part of world efforts to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons, a Japanese newspaper said on Thursday.

Resource-poor Japan has been planning to develop Iran's Azadegan oil field, estimated to hold the world's second-biggest single oil reserve, despite objections from Washington.

But Japan's top government spokesman, Shinzo Abe, said Tokyo's plans to develop Azadegan were not currently a topic of discussion with the United States and added that the project was vital for Japan's aim of securing stable energy supplies .

The report comes a week after Japan's largest refiner, Nippon Oil Corp., said it would cut imports of Iranian crude due to rising risks associated with the country, the first hint that Tehran's nuclear dispute is affecting its vital oil trade.

According to U.S. government sources quoted by the daily Sankei Shimbun , U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick and Undersecretary of State Robert Joseph informally asked Japan to at least temporarily suspend its plans to develop Azadegan.

The request was based on the belief that developing the field would provide income for Iran that could support its nuclear activities, as well as make it hard for the international community to present a united front in dealing with Iran, the newspaper said.

It said there was a movement within the U.S. Congress to make a similar request.

Asked about Azadegan, Japan's Abe said Tokyo would pay heed both to nuclear non-proliferation and its own energy needs.

"It is not the case that the Japanese government is holding concrete discussions at this juncture with the United States regarding the future direction of the development of the Azadegan oil field," said Abe, the chief cabinet secretary.

"We would like to deal with this firmly based upon our basic recognition that both...the nuclear non-proliferation issue and stable crude oil supplies are important," Abe told reporters.

ENERGY SECURITY

Japan sealed a deal with Iran two years ago on a billion-dollar project to develop Azadegan.

The Japanese government has a 36 percent stake in INPEX Corp., Japan 's biggest oil developer, which plans to develop the southern part of Azadegan, estimated to hold 26 billion barrels of oil.

An INPEX official said it has not been contacted by the U.S. or Japanese governments regarding the Azadegan oilfield, and officials at Japan's foreign and trade ministries declined to comment.

The United Nations Security Council, which can impose sanctions, has so far failed to reach accord on a statement calling on Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment activities.

Both Russia and China have balked at approving a draft statement, fearing that threats might escalate and prompt Iran to cut off allcontact with the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency.

Earlier this month, John Bolton, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, urged Japan to work with Washington, saying that he understood Japan's difficult energy situation but that the global community had to work together to combat nuclear proliferation.

Resource-poor Japan imported almost all of its crude oil needs amounting to 4.2 million barrels per day (bpd) last year, and about 90 percent of the volume was supplied by Middle Eastern producers.

Iran is Japan's third-largest oil supplier, and Tokyo has maintained healthy relations with Tehran even at the expense of upsetting Washington .

But Nippon Oil said last week it would reduce its purchases of Iranian crude by an average of 22,000 bpd to 120,000 bpd this year in view of growing risks related to the country.

The cut represents 2 percent of its refining capacity.

The company will reduce Iranian crude imports via traders but will not change the amount that it purchases through direct long-term contracts with Iran.

A government council said on Wednesday that Japan should more than double crude oil imports from its equity oilfields in the next 25 years to improve energy security.

Additional reporting by Ikuko Kao and Masayuki Kitano. This Reuters report appeared on March 23, 2006. Posted at Japan Focus, March 26, 2006.

The 2019 Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize in Japanese Literature, Thought, and Society

The Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University is pleased to announce the 2019 prize honoring the life and work of our colleague, Kyoko Selden. The prize will pay homage to the finest achievements in Japanese literature, thought, and society through the medium of translation. Kyoko Selden's translations and writings ranged widely across such realms as Japanese women writers, Japanese art and aesthetics, the atomic bomb experience, Ainu and Okinawan life and culture, historical and contemporary literature, poetry and prose, and early education (the Suzuki method). Recognizing the breadth of Japanese writings, classical and contemporary, and with the aim of making such materials more widely available, we ask that prize submissions be of unpublished translations. Collaborative translations are welcomed. In order to encourage classroom use and wide dissemination of the winning entries, prize-winning translations will be made freely available on the web. The winning translations will be published online at The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus.

Prize selections will take into account both the quality of the translation and the significance of the original work. In cases where a text already published in English is deemed worthy of retranslation, new translations of significant texts are accepted (please provide date and place of earlier publication). Applicants should submit the following hard copies to the Kyoko Selden Memorial Translation Prize, Department of Asian Studies, 350 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853:

  • 1 copy of an unpublished translation
  • 1 copy of a statement of up to 1,000 words explaining the significance of the text. Although we do not require that the translator has already obtained permission to publish the translation from the copyright holder, please include in the statement information about whether preliminary inquiries have been made or whether or not the work is in the public domain.
  • 1 printed copy of the original Japanese text
  • A brief c.v. of the translator
  • In addition, please send electronic copies of all the above as attachments to seldenprize@cornell.edu.

The maximum length of a submission is 20,000 words. In case

of translation of longer works, submit an excerpt of up to 20,000 words. Repeat submissions are welcomed. Please note that

the closing date for the prize competition this year will be August 1, 2019. For the 2019 competition, one prize of $1,500 will be awarded in two different categories:

1) to an already published translator; 2) to an unpublished translator. The winners will be informed by November 1, 2019.

For further information, please visit the Asian Studies website or send questions to seldenprize@cornell.edu.